BEACON MAGAZINE

The ForumIn JestPeople, Places, & ThingsSights & SoundsFictionArchive

Back in Sessionthoughts on season 4 of “Community” by R. Decgraphic by A. Ballo Season 4 of “Community” continues to harbor the same zaniness, spontaneity and quirkiness from prior seasons. Likely due to the departure of producer/creator Dan Harmon, “Community” seems to be taking a slightly different direction in comedic style, but fans continue to rejoice in the band of misfits known as both “the study group” and “the Greendale Seven.” Relationships among the characters have changed, some argue for the better, and others for the worse. With Britta and Troy dating, Abed developing new friendships, and all-around watered-down tension among the study groupers, the characters seem to have morphed into more typified characters found on TV. Those who appreciate the oddities found in “Community” may at first be disheartened, but need only look to the show’s cast of secondary characters for fulfillment. Perpetually-ostracized Chang suffers the supposedly-amnesiac condition of “Changnesia,” which suggests hilarity to come, and many characters brought on exclusively for their strangeness (like, say, Dean Pelton) retain their quirks. New characters, including Inspector Spacetime-obsessed Toby of “Conventions of Space and Time” (played by Matt Lucas), promise a future of continuing weirdness. People started watching “Community” for two things: the humor and the characters. Both evolve, as with any TV show, but “Community” isn’t about to lose its defining traits any time soon. And for that, we thank the brilliance of the cast, the willingness of NBC to broadcast offbeat television, and Annie’s boobs.

Back in Sessionthoughts on season 4 of “Community”
by R. Decgraphic by A. Ballo
Season 4 of “Community” continues to harbor the same zaniness, spontaneity and quirkiness from prior seasons. Likely due to the departure of producer/creator Dan Harmon, “Community” seems to be taking a slightly different direction in comedic style, but fans continue to rejoice in the band of misfits known as both “the study group” and “the Greendale Seven.”
Relationships among the characters have changed, some argue for the better, and others for the worse. With Britta and Troy dating, Abed developing new friendships, and all-around watered-down tension among the study groupers, the characters seem to have morphed into more typified characters found on TV. Those who appreciate the oddities found in “Community” may at first be disheartened, but need only look to the show’s cast of secondary characters for fulfillment.
Perpetually-ostracized Chang suffers the supposedly-amnesiac condition of “Changnesia,” which suggests hilarity to come, and many characters brought on exclusively for their strangeness (like, say, Dean Pelton) retain their quirks. New characters, including Inspector Spacetime-obsessed Toby of “Conventions of Space and Time” (played by Matt Lucas), promise a future of continuing weirdness.
People started watching “Community” for two things: the humor and the characters. Both evolve, as with any TV show, but “Community” isn’t about to lose its defining traits any time soon.
And for that, we thank the brilliance of the cast, the willingness of NBC to broadcast offbeat television, and Annie’s boobs.

Back in Session
thoughts on season 4 of “Community”

by R. Dec
graphic by A. Ballo

Season 4 of “Community” continues to harbor the same zaniness, spontaneity and quirkiness from prior seasons. Likely due to the departure of producer/creator Dan Harmon, “Community” seems to be taking a slightly different direction in comedic style, but fans continue to rejoice in the band of misfits known as both “the study group” and “the Greendale Seven.”

Relationships among the characters have changed, some argue for the better, and others for the worse. With Britta and Troy dating, Abed developing new friendships, and all-around watered-down tension among the study groupers, the characters seem to have morphed into more typified characters found on TV. Those who appreciate the oddities found in “Community” may at first be disheartened, but need only look to the show’s cast of secondary characters for fulfillment.

Perpetually-ostracized Chang suffers the supposedly-amnesiac condition of “Changnesia,” which suggests hilarity to come, and many characters brought on exclusively for their strangeness (like, say, Dean Pelton) retain their quirks. New characters, including Inspector Spacetime-obsessed Toby of “Conventions of Space and Time” (played by Matt Lucas), promise a future of continuing weirdness.

People started watching “Community” for two things: the humor and the characters. Both evolve, as with any TV show, but “Community” isn’t about to lose its defining traits any time soon.

And for that, we thank the brilliance of the cast, the willingness of NBC to broadcast offbeat television, and Annie’s boobs.

8 notes

  1. ihascatz reblogged this from beaconmag
  2. edieth3owl reblogged this from beaconmag
  3. gone--wilde reblogged this from echoohce
  4. echoohce reblogged this from beaconmag
  5. beaconmag posted this